Hillclimb registration fills in less than two days; Tin Mountain Conservation Center benefits.

The Tin Mountain Conservation Center in Albany, N.H., happily announced this week its annual combination of good news and bad news and more good news to cyclists who want to pedal up the ultra-steep Mt. Washington Auto Road this summer.

The good news: The field for the 38th installment of the grueling Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb was filled to its 600-rider capacity on February 2, less than 34 hours after the Tin Mountain web site opened for registrations. The race’s appeal, even in an economic recession, brings unwavering support for Tin Mountain’s summer camps and its school and community programs that promote appreciation for the natural world and sustainable lifestyles. All riders’ entry fees help deliver this message.

The bad news? Only that the Hillclimb, which will take place on August 21, cannot accommodate more riders (unless someone drops out in which case there’s a waiting list).

The further good news: For the fifth year in a row, the Mt. Washington Auto Road will be open for an additional race up the same 7.6-mile course to the summit of the highest peak in the Northeast. Registration is now open for Newton’s Revenge, which was created in 2006 to accommodate the swelling demand for a chance to bike to the summit of Mt. Washington. Newton’s Revenge will take place this year on July 10, following the same format as the August Hillclimb. Cyclists can register on line at www.newtonsrevenge.com.

Frequently described as a climb more difficult than any in the Tour de France, the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb is a major attraction for professional and serious amateur cyclists. A strong ride at Mt. Washington helps an aspiring pro to establish credentials as one of the world’s best climbers and to attract the attention of top-tier racing teams. Course record-holder Tom Danielson (49:24) and 2004 winner Justin England both went on from Mt. Washington to higher-profile careers racing in Europe.

For amateurs, the race is a challenge like no other “an extreme sport before there were extreme sports,” as the race program often describes the event.

First held in 1973, the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb operated under various directorships until the 1990s, when the Tin Mountain Conservation Center became the organizing body for the race, and the race became the primary fundraising event for the conservation center. The event’s popularity grew along with the growing popularity of cycling in the United States and the rising visibility of American cyclists on the European circuit.

In 2006, in response to the ever-rising demand for places in the Hillclimb field, the Mt. Washington Auto Road company inaugurated Newton’s Revenge, which follows the same course up the windswept mountain. Registration for Newton’s Revenge opens as soon as the field for the Hillclimb has reached capacity. As of today, approximately 100 riders have already registered for Newton’s Revenge  a much larger number at this point than in previous years. Of that number, 23 cyclists have signed up for both the Hillclimb and Newton’s Revenge.

A complete list of riders registered for the Hillclimb is available at www.bikereg.com or at the race web site, www.mwarbh.org.

Both the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb and Newton’s Revenge are part of the Bicycle Up the Mountain Point Series (BUMPS), in which riders accumulate points based on their finishes in nine uphill bike races in the Northeast between June and October. The men’s and women’s champions for the series are crowned following the final race in the series, at Mt. Greylock in Massachusetts. For further information see www.hillclimbseries.com.

The entry fee for the Hillclimb is $350. The entry fee for Newton’s Revenge is $300, except that a discounted entry fee of $150 is offered to anyone entering Newton’s Revenge who is already registered for the Hillclimb.

The Mt. Washington Auto Road is open to cyclists only four days each year: the two race days, plus a practice ride for each race. This summer the practice rides are on June 6, for Newton’s Revenge, and July 18 for the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb.

In its 7.6 miles the Auto Road climbs 4650 feet at an average grade of 12 percent and a wall-like 22 percent in the final 50 yards. And then there’s the always unpredictable

February 12, 2010 Pinkham Notch, N.H.

The Tin Mountain Conservation Center in Albany, N.H., happily announced this week its annual combination of good news and bad news and more good news to cyclists who want to pedal up the ultra-steep Mt. Washington Auto Road this summer.

The good news: The field for the 38th installment of the grueling Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb was filled to its 600-rider capacity on February 2, less than 34 hours after the Tin Mountain web site opened for registrations. The race’s appeal, even in an economic recession, brings unwavering support for Tin Mountain’s summer camps and its school and community programs that promote appreciation for the natural world and sustainable lifestyles. All riders’ entry fees help deliver this message.

The bad news? Only that the Hillclimb, which will take place on August 21, cannot accommodate more riders (unless someone drops out in which case there’s a waiting list).

The further good news: For the fifth year in a row, the Mt. Washington Auto Road will be open for an additional race up the same 7.6-mile course to the summit of the highest peak in the Northeast. Registration is now open for Newton’s Revenge, which was created in 2006 to accommodate the swelling demand for a chance to bike to the summit of Mt. Washington. Newton’s Revenge will take place this year on July 10, following the same format as the August Hillclimb. Cyclists can register on line at www.newtonsrevenge.com.

Frequently described as a climb more difficult than any in the Tour de France, the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb is a major attraction for professional and serious amateur cyclists. A strong ride at Mt. Washington helps an aspiring pro to establish credentials as one of the world’s best climbers and to attract the attention of top-tier racing teams. Course record-holder Tom Danielson (49:24) and 2004 winner Justin England both went on from Mt. Washington to higher-profile careers racing in Europe.

For amateurs, the race is a challenge like no other “an extreme sport before there were extreme sports,” as the race program often describes the event.

First held in 1973, the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb operated under various directorships until the 1990s, when the Tin Mountain Conservation Center became the organizing body for the race, and the race became the primary fundraising event for the conservation center. The event’s popularity grew along with the growing popularity of cycling in the United States and the rising visibility of American cyclists on the European circuit.

In 2006, in response to the ever-rising demand for places in the Hillclimb field, the Mt. Washington Auto Road company inaugurated Newton’s Revenge, which follows the same course up the windswept mountain. Registration for Newton’s Revenge opens as soon as the field for the Hillclimb has reached capacity. As of today, approximately 100 riders have already registered for Newton’s Revenge  a much larger number at this point than in previous years. Of that number, 23 cyclists have signed up for both the Hillclimb and Newton’s Revenge.

A complete list of riders registered for the Hillclimb is available at www.bikereg.com or at the race web site, www.mwarbh.org.

Both the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb and Newton’s Revenge are part of the Bicycle Up the Mountain Point Series (BUMPS), in which riders accumulate points based on their finishes in nine uphill bike races in the Northeast between June and October. The men’s and women’s champions for the series are crowned following the final race in the series, at Mt. Greylock in Massachusetts. For further information see www.hillclimbseries.com.

The entry fee for the Hillclimb is $350. The entry fee for Newton’s Revenge is $300, except that a discounted entry fee of $150 is offered to anyone entering Newton’s Revenge who is already registered for the Hillclimb.

The Mt. Washington Auto Road is open to cyclists only four days each year: the two race days, plus a practice ride for each race. This summer the practice rides are on June 6, for Newton’s Revenge, and July 18 for the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb.

In its 7.6 miles the Auto Road climbs 4650 feet at an average grade of 12 percent and a wall-like 22 percent in the final 50 yards. And then there’s the always unpredictable

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